Home News Center D.C. Advocate Wins National Award for Her Advocacy for Youth in Trouble with the Law

D.C. Advocate Wins National Award for Her Advocacy for Youth in Trouble with the Law

June 14, 2018

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact:
Josh Gordon, 217-801-2009
gordon@njjn.org

@NJJNetwork

D.C. Advocate Wins National Award for Her Advocacy for Youth in Trouble with the Law
Honored as a “Gutsy Advocate for Youth”

WASHINGTON – LaShunda Hill is being recognized next month for her tenacious work on behalf of
young people in trouble with the law.

Ms. Hill embodies an unrelenting commitment to youth justice reform and to racial justice, has been a leader in the national movement for a fairer system, and has been a stalwart partner of the National Juvenile Justice Network (NJJN) for many years.

“I am so pleased to honor LaShunda with this award for the tremendous energy and passion she brings to her many leadership positions within our national movement,” said Sarah Bryer, NJJN’s Executive Director. 

Hill is the seventh recipient of the Beth Arnovits Gutsy Advocate for Youth Award, which is given annually by the National Juvenile Justice Network (NJJN) to an individual who advocates for youth justice and juvenile justice reform and exemplifies “the tenacity, vision, fearlessness and wisdom of Beth Arnovits,” one of NJJN’s founders. The award will be given July 17, 2018, at an annual gathering of youth justice advocates from across the country. This year the conference is hosted in Durham, North Carolina.

“LaShunda’s unwavering vision for a more just world, where young people are free to be exactly who they dream of becoming makes her the perfect choice for this honor,” said Maheen Kaleem, program officer for the Initiative to End Violence Against Girls and Women.

Hill has devoted herself to the freedom and well-being of youth. She has done so both in her professional and non-professional endeavors. She shows up with the same deep commitment whether at the Campaign for Fair Sentencing of Youth, Pew Public Safety Performance Project, as a service provider, a youth advocate or as a board member for organizations supporting the mothers, wives, and sisters of the incarcerated. Her knowledge about both the criminal and juvenile justice systems and the levers for change are broad and deep, and she utilizes her expertise and wisdom to find new ways to improve outcomes for youth whether through legislative advocacy, working with system stakeholders, or visioning programs that are accountable to the youth they are serving.

Hill brings a unique ability to be both patient and passionate in her pursuit of youth justice. She believes that to do right by our youth our goals must be lofty, while recognizing and not getting defeated by the incremental steps that those goals might require.

“I nominated LaShunda for this award because she’s devoted her life to the freedom and well-being of youth” says Kaleem. “She utilizes her deep expertise and wisdom to find new ways to improve outcomes for youth, whether through legislative advocacy, building the capacity of system stakeholders, or visioning programs that are intentional and accountable to the youth they are serving. To the youth justice field she brings an unparalleled level of intention and integrity and an unadulterated commitment to young people whose lives, communities, and families have been impacted by the criminal and juvenile justice systems. She personifies all of the attributes befitting this honor and is a wonderful role model for other advocates.”

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The National Juvenile Justice Network is composed of coalitions, organizations and alumni of the Youth Justice Leadership Institute across 41 states and the District of Columbia, all of whom advocate for a fairer justice system for children and teens. For more information, visit www.njjn.org.

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